Resources for the Public

Frequently Asked Questions

What is unbundling?

Unbundling allows clients to hire an attorney to assist them with only part of their case, such as drafting documents or appearing at a single hearing. Unbundled matters are completed in a fraction of the time of full representation. This means that attorneys generally charge lower fees for unbundled matters.

How can I find an attorney who offers unbundled services?

Access to Justice hosts a directory of attorneys who offer unbundled services in Arkansas. That directory can be found here. We offer only a directory of attorneys offering unbundled services. We are not making any claims about the qualifications of individual attorneys or the quality of their services. The directory is a service provided free to the public.

How much does it cost?

The fee an attorney will charge for unbundled services varies based on the type of assistance you are seeking, the complexity of your case, and attorney’s level of experience and expertise. However, you can generally expect that the fee for unbundled services will be substantially lower than an attorney’s ordinary fee. Some unbundled services may start as low as around $50 for services such as advice or as high as several hundred dollars for services such as drafting legal documents and providing filing instructions.

Can’t I just find all the forms and information I need online?

While many sites offer forms and legal information online for free or for a fee, those services often will result in problems with your case. Why? Here are some of the reasons:

  • It’s important to know that you’re getting the correct form or reading the correct article.
    • If you get a form for a power of attorney, but what you really need is a power of attorney for healthcare, you won’t accomplish what you need. An Arkansas licensed attorney who offers unbundled services will talk with you first to make sure the form they prepare will do what you need it to do.
  • Arkansas law isn’t always the same as the law of other states.
    • In fact many times it’s not only different, it’s very different. For instance, a divorce complaint you find online might list irreconcilable differences as a ground for divorce. While this might work fine in the state where the form was created, you can’t get a divorce in Arkansas if your ground is irreconcilable differences. An Arkansas licensed attorney who offers unbundled services knows the law in Arkansas and will be able to create a form that works within the laws we have here.
  • Many online services don’t offer any help after you get started.
    • Filing a document with the Court (if that’s what is required in your case) is just the first step of a process. Many other steps will need to be taken, such as completing service (in almost all cases). Many services which are based online won’t provide you with the support you need to complete additional steps, such as service. An Arkansas licensed attorney who offers unbundled services can coach you on the next steps you’ll need to take after they help you prepare a document. Many of  these attorneys will also allow you to come back to them at any time for additional help for a flat fee for a half hour or hour of advice.
  • Some online services will offer a low quality product.
    • When this happens, it may be the case that your options for getting your money back or fixing the problem created in your case are limited. By contrast, an Arkansas licensed attorney who offers unbundling is subject to the Arkansas Rules of Professional Conduct. These rules require that the attorney offer you competent service and keep information you provide them confidential. If an attorney violates these rules, you have rights. You can file a grievance with the Office of Professional Conduct against an attorney who violates the rules. This helps to ensure that the attorney provides good service. Many online services will not be subject to the Arkansas Rules of Professional Conduct and, therefore, you will not be able to file a grievance against them with the Office of Professional Conduct.

Where can I find additional resources?